When autism seems like a little thing.

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I’ve been a little out of writing for the past week or more because we received a phone call from our daughter’s pediatrician letting us know they incidentally discovered she had an enlarged heart on an x-ray.  Fast forward through a few days of nail biting, extreme stress, and a quite a few fearful tears, we got our baby girl to a local children’s hospital to discover that whatever was on her x-ray was no longer there.  No, the original x-ray was not a “bad” one– three doctors concurred on this– the problems on it simply were not there when she had further testing.

What I learned:

1. Miracles happen.  However one might want to interpret the above story, it is a miracle that our baby is well.

2. Autism is serious.  Autism is an everyday challenge.  Autism is an uncertain and definitive part of our lives, but it is still about life.  The focus on our son’s therapy is on improving his life, one little bit by bit, so that longterm he will be independent, happy, successful.  There is no goal to simply keep him alive.  He has to have an MRI due to some of his regressions, and I though deep down I know there is a very tiny itsy bitsy chance there could be something scary on this MRI, I suspect there will simply be some developmental anomalies that explain some of why my son is who he is.  Or not.  We’ll see.

 

These are things for which I am grateful.  Life was put into perspective in our household this month.  Live life to its fullest, people.

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About rhapsodyinautism

I'm a Mom of two little ones-- a two-year-old son newly diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and a baby girl who is too young to make any guesses. I work a little bit from home for an environmental nonprofit, and I am a freelance journalist. I love cooking, singing, and autumn weather. And I'm married to a brilliant, involved Daddy. My son is an auburn-haired smartypants who loves trucks and jazz. He taught himself the alphabet at 20 months. He has a beautiful social smile, but he finds eye contact aversive. He is the reason I am writing this blog... because there is a huge lack in legislation, funding, insurance coverage, and understanding in regards to autism spectrum disorders. This will be my place to advocate, tell the tale of our journey, and hopefully share a few tears and laughs along the way. This is our family life, and we have embraced it.

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